Case Study of Chronic Calf Pain

Posted by Ove Indergaard on December 20, 2015 . 0 Comments

Case Study of Chronic Calf Pain

I thought I’d share a case study regarding a recent patient of mine that I have just discharged. He is a 79 year old man who uses walking as the main method of maintaining his fitness and managing his weight as he also has diabetes.

He was referred to me from a colleague who he had seen in a different part of the country, after 3 years of suffering with this calf pain. Other than the calf pain he is in great shape, and has been checked out with Doppler US, MRI and had several consultant referrals over this time. Any neuro involvement was also ruled out. He was also having acupuncture which gave him some short term relief.

Functionally on the first assessment he was walking with an antalgic gait patter, and was unwilling to put weight through his left leg even on standing. He had reduced dorsiflexion on...

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Oh Thumbs!

Posted by Ove Indergaard on December 20, 2015 . 0 Comments

Oh Thumbs!

 

One of the main things that sparked my interest in Tool Assisted Soft Tissue Massage were the problems I was experiencing daily in my thumbs and my hands. And with thumbs like mine (as pictured below) I guess this was inevitable in my profession. It appears I am not the only one suffering from problems due to my occupation, and several studies has shown the extent of the problem.

Cromie and colleagues (2000) investigated the extent of work related musculoskeletal disorders in physiotherapists. They found that 91% of physiotherapist will suffer from work related pain at some point in their careers, and disturbingly 1 in 6 physios changed their job or left the profession as a result. They also found that you were more likely to suffer from pain if you were in the early years of your practice. Other studies have mentioned that up to 38% of physios...

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EDGE mobility bands - Hamstrings

Posted by Ove Indergaard on December 20, 2015 . 0 Comments

Had some time in the clinic this week, so I managed to film a little video demonstrating how I use the mobility band to release the hamstrings. This is usually how I start my soft tissue work due to the dramatic changes that the technique has, and the lack of discomfort to the patient. In this video the actual treatment time is in real time and takes less than 45 seconds with a great change in the passive leg raise as demonstrated on my colleague, who has tightness in his hamstrings. Enjoy, and I welcome any comments you may have.

 

 

 

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Must read

Posted by Ove Indergaard on December 20, 2015 . 0 Comments

Must read

Here is a link to  a must read article from The Scientist written by one of the most prominent fascia researchers Helen Langevin.

http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/35301/title/The-Science-of-Stretch/

 

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'An Introduction to IASTM' eBook is here!!

Posted by Ove Indergaard on December 16, 2015 . 0 Comments



So we are excited to announce our first eBook is now out and ready to be downloaded. The book goes through some of the most recent, and relevant research and theories around IASTM (Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilisation) and goes through some practical tips on how to get the most out of your assessment and treatment using the IASTM techniques. It goes through a comprehensive list of techniques for spinal, upper limb and  the lower limb. As a bonus, we have included links to some videos to further explain and demonstrate how this should be performed. The book is intended to be a introduction to the IASTM techniques and to enable you to be able to use these excellent techniques very quickly.

IASTM is a very easy and effective soft tissue technique that works through stimulation of the...

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The challenge is to go lighter...

Posted by Ove Indergaard on December 16, 2015 . 0 Comments

The challenge is to go lighter...

Having spent some days out and about with a few IASTM users lately I often come across a variety of therapists using IASTM tools and techniques. As so often happens in manual therapy progression is often by applying more force. Not only does this mean more discomfort for the therapist, but also more discomfort for the patient to endure. And from my experience I see a lot of people applying similar methods with the IASTM tools. Ye

s, there is less fatigue in the hands and shoulders for the therapist, but the discomfort for the patient is still there. And this is the problem. When we are treating patients/clients we are often dealing with people who are experiencing tissues sensitised by pain. Causing further pain at this stage may just enhance the threat to their system,and should in my opinion be avoided.

In these, and most cases I...

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